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Snapshot of Community Projects as a Result of a VCRD Community Visit

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Snapshot of Community Projects as a Result of a VCRD Community Visit

Almost all towns have built community spirit and engaged new volunteers. Projects have been advanced and accomplished ranging from a town merger in Richford, to building a senior living project in Wilmington, revitalizing downtowns in Bellows Falls and Brandon, or building a youth center in Bradford. Samples of town accomplishments are listed below.

  • Newport (2018): boosting Newport events and celebrations and doing all in their power to actualize their assets for tourism and economic development.
  • Burke (2017): improving traffic and pedestrian safety in East Burke Village, revitalizing water and sewer infrastructure in West Burke Village, and working to expand educational facilities at the Burke Town School.
  • Lyndon (2017): planning towards a Wi-Fi zone, and a public/private partnership with Northern Vermont University including a co-working space in the Bag Balm building in the heart of the downtown.
  • Brighton (2016): holding local events, celebrations, and recreation programs for all ages through their new Brighton Recreation Committee, engaging community volunteers, businesses and planning consultants to revitalize the village center, and making Brighton more accessible and inviting to ATV riders and snowmobilers.
  • Vernon (2016): designing a new village center, developing a community cafe, developing improved recreational trails, and working to generate new businesses in buildings connected to the plant.
  • Hardwick (2016): working to expand Jeudevine Library space and services, enhance the downtown and build a business and economic development network, and develop mentorship and career building opportunities for Hardwick youth.
  • Craftsbury (2015): improving cell phone and broadband infrastructure and connection for the town, hosting town wide events and conversations around land use, building connection between the schools, businesses, and the community, and started "Craftsbury Saplings" a new community childcare center.
  • St Johnsbury (2015): Improving community communications and promoting a positive Town image; developing a St. Johnsbury warming shelter; redeveloping and revitalizing downtown buildings; redeveloping the St. Johnsbury riverfront; and improving housing in downtown St. Johnsbury.
  • Swanton (2015): Expanding outdoor recreation opportunities, river access, bike-ability and bike tourism; created a very active Swanton Arts Council; built a Swanton economic development committee; working to reduce substance abuse; and improving traffic, walkability, and parking downtown.
  • Cambridge (2014): Developing a Senior Living Center and expanding senior services; advancing a Cambridge Community Center; expanding communications, capacity, and efficiency for community and economic development; and evaluating municipal structure to better coordinate efforts for the long-term benefit of the community.
  • Vergennes (2014): Improving the physical appearance of the Falls Basin area and developing a river-walk; coordinating efforts to improve the economic outlook of the City; and working on sidewalk extensions and other transportation improvements.
  • Manchester (2013): Redevelopment underway on Battenkill Riverside, biking task force expanding routes and facilities; incubating businesses and setting up a structure for expanded adult and continuing education opportunities.
  • Guilford (2013): Redeveloping the Grange Building; working to incubate new businesses in village center; and expanding pre-school and community center activities.
  • Cabot (2012): Developed a farmers’ network; built a new arts association and arts center task force; and improved communications and scheduling.
  • Bennington (2011): Developed new communications tools and branding; built and anti-poverty campaign that expanded low income dental care.
  • Morrisville (2011): Has developed a framework for a new community foods coop, expanded paths and trails and improving buildings and economic development downtown.
  • Marlboro (2010): Planning for a Marlboro Community Center Building to serve as a connecting point for multiple groups in the community. They are also working to improve walk-ability and expand bike and walking paths. 
  • Fairfield (2010): Improved community communications and calendar, built new markets and movement for agricultural partners including a new on-line farmers market.
  • Shoreham (2009): Working to attract village economic development and to build a business incubator. Other initiatives include improving civic participation and exploring in town energy opportunities.
  • Killington (2008): Built a system for positive Town/Mountain communications and problem solving; set a 4‐season economic development planning process with substantial funding from a 1% municipal rooms, meals, and sales tax.
  • Derby (2007): Evaluating steps toward town/village merger and solving water sewer infrastructure issues.
  • Richford (2007): Working to increase police protection and its connection to community; new health center and grocery in the old Sweat Comings property seen as keystone to future downtown development.
  • Pownal (2006): Established a Housing Task Force that built a mobile home tenants association and is planning for an affordable housing project; developed community gardens and activities; built tourism map and a communications campaign to tell the good story of the town’s success.
  • Hinesburg (2006): The town voted funds to contract for services to advance initiatives; improved energy efficiency, stopped bus idling, lightbulb campaign, advanced the agricultural economy.
  • Chelsea (2005): Gained ACCD Planning Grant to staff Community Visit Task Forces, building a community facilities and infrastructure plan.
  • Woodstock (2005): Set community priorities for town/village merger, built an east end development corporation, expanding conservation, expanded walking trails and developed a town trails map, and building a Woodstock Vision.
  • Johnson (2004): Leveraged significant federal funds to replace three bridges, build a water system, and implement redesign of downtown; built a community calendar, and instituted a Winter Carnival and a summer concert series to unite and market the community.
  • Bristol (2004): Inventoried potential space for small industrial park, set key attributes of businesses to attract, redeveloping Bartlett Falls area, improved storm water system.
  • Enosburg (2003): Instituted a community‐wide literacy campaign and mentorship program, set up a Restorative Justice Board, new recreation park, town web page, unified town/village public works, financing, planning/zoning and offices.
  • Troy, Westfield, Jay (2002): Built walking trails and events celebrating downtown Troy and took steps in the development of “Tranquil Gardens.”
  • Poultney (2002): Built new youth activities and mentorships, expanded collaborations with Green Mountain College, designed new town banners and a town marketing strategy, beautified Main Street and filled storefronts, developed a Community Video, started Artist and Writers Guilds, opened the slate museum, built a consensus Vision for the community.
  • Wilmington (2001): Built a Vision for Wilmington’s future economic development, built a senior housing project.
  • Northfield (2001): Redeveloped the old town school as a community center and set agreements for water/wastewater development.
  • Bradford (1999): Village revitalization was boosted with library repairs, the development of Boch park, and ongoing affordable housing efforts; work proceeding still toward town/village merger.
  • Middletown Springs (1999): Built sections of the town plan and set up the Middletown Springs Conservation Commission.
  • Brandon (1999): Earned Downtown Designation and encouraged significant downtown investment, built a town economic development budget, promoted new recreation development and seeded Brandon’s recent success as a creative economy model.
  • Rockingham (1998): Downtown housing, downtown revitalization, and rebuilding the Bellows Falls image were goals accomplished: today the reborn downtown is a model of creative economy development.
  • Richford (1996): Merged village & town; built affordable housing, river paths, a new health center and plans to redevelop Sweat‐Cummings downtown industrial plant; charted millions in grants in support of Community Visit Task Force action plans.